Pertinent Category: Sound Money Project

The Sound Money Project was founded in January 2009 to conduct research and promote awareness about monetary stability and financial privacy. The project is comprised of leading academics and practitioners in money, banking, and macroeconomics. It offers regular commentary and in-depth analysis on monetary policy, alternative monetary systems, financial markets regulation, cryptocurrencies, and the history of monetary and macroeconomic thought. For the latest on sound money issues, subscribe to our working paper series and follow along on Twitter or Facebook.

Advisory Board: Steve H. Hanke, Jerry L. Jordan, Lawrence H. White
Director: William J. Luther
Senior Fellows: Nicolás Cachanosky, Gerald P. DwyerJoshua R. Hendrickson, Thomas L. Hogan, Gerald P. O’Driscoll, Jr., Alexander W. Salter
Fellows: J.P. Koning

FOMC Holds Rates, Revises Forward Guidance

– June 12, 2024

“Just as the FOMC was slow to adjust policy when inflation surged in late 2021, it will be slow to adjust policy as inflation returns to and falls below its target in 2024.” ~William J Luther

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Prices Stable in May: Time to Cut Rates?

– June 12, 2024

“M2, the most commonly cited measure of the money supply, is up 0.53 percent from a year ago. Since real income and population are growing faster than this, current M2 growth also suggests money is tight. But this is speculative.” ~Alexander W. Salter

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Inflation Continued to Decline in April

– June 1, 2024

“While inflation is declining once more, members of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) have suggested rates would need to remain high for longer than they had previously projected.” ~William J. Luther

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Is The Fed Manipulating the Market?

– May 15, 2024

“We cannot just look at the Fed’s target rate to determine whether it is manipulating the market. We must consider its target rate relative to the natural rate.” ~Bryan Cutsinger

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Chairman Powell and The Fed’s Limits

– May 9, 2024

“Congress should applaud Chairman Powell’s candor on uncertainty and strongly support his principle of operating the Fed within the limits of its mandate.” ~Alex J. Pollock

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Inflation Declined in March, But Remains High

– April 26, 2024

“Market participants continue to expect the Fed will cut its federal funds rate target this year — just not anytime soon.” ~ William J. Luther

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A Better Model Won’t Fix The Fed

– April 23, 2024

“The whole point of expectations-responsive monetary policy is to remove the discretionary and technocratic elements from central banking. Disappointingly but unsurprisingly, the Fed is doing the opposite: doubling down on discretion and technocracy.” ~Alexander W. Salter

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Why Haven’t We Whipped Inflation Yet?

– April 19, 2024

“The best we can do is recalibrate models when we get new data. But that’s like driving the car while looking out the rearview window…hardly ideal for knowing how to adjust your steering.” ~Alexander W. Salter

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Inflation We Can Feel But Don’t Measure

– April 16, 2024

“Regardless of whether one thinks that the CPI should include interest rates and/or asset prices, it seems clear that consumers factor in these costs when evaluating the cost of living.” ~Joshua R. Hendrickson

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Inflation Remained Elevated in February

– March 29, 2024

“Market participants continue to expect three cuts this year — and that those cuts will begin in the first half of the year. But they have adjusted the odds.” ~William J. Luther

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Fact-Checking “Greedflation”

– March 18, 2024

“By fueling an overall increase in demand, central banks can generate a sustained increase in the general level of prices — inflation. Central banks are the primary source of money creation, not firms.” ~Nicolás Cachanosky

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Inflation Remains Elevated. Is Money Actually Tight?

– March 13, 2024

” Fed watchers expect the Federal Open Market Committee will keep rates steady when they meet on March 19-20. In light of the CPI data, that’s a defensible move.” ~Alexander W. Salter

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