AIER’s Everyday Price Index Jumps 1.2 Percent in October

– November 10, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index posted its eleventh consecutive increase in October on widespread gains. Price pressures remain elevated due to the lingering effects of the pandemic. As these effects fade, price pressures are likely to ease.” ~ Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Groceries Feed Gains in the Everyday Price Index in September

– October 13, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index posted its tenth consecutive increase in September led by groceries. Prices of many goods and services continue to be distorted by the lingering effects of the pandemic including shortages, logistical and supply chain issues, and labor problems. As these distortions fade, price pressures are likely to ease.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Everyday Price Index Rises at a Slower Pace in August

– September 14, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index posted a slower gain in August but is still up 6.8 percent from a year ago. Prices of many goods and services continue to be distorted by the lingering effects of the pandemic and government shutdowns. As these distortions fade, price pressures are likely to ease.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Everyday Price Index Outpaces the CPI in July

– August 11, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index rose again, led by food and energy. Prices for many goods and services are still distorted by the lingering effects of government shutdowns. As these distortions fade, price pressures are likely to ease.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Everyday Prices Continued to Surge in June

– July 13, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index posted a seventh straight monthly increase, reflecting a wide range of lingering fallout from government lockdowns. As these issues are worked out, price pressures are likely to ease.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Everyday Prices Rise at the Fastest Annual Pace Since 2011

– June 10, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index posted a sixth straight monthly increase, reflecting a wide range of materials shortages, logistical, supply chain, and labor problems. As these issues are worked out, price pressures are likely to ease.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE
Retail sales

Everyday Prices Rise 6.1 Percent from a Year Ago

– May 12, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index posted the largest yearly rise since 2011. Many prices across the economy are still reflecting distortions from government lockdowns that have caused a wide range of materials shortages, logistical, supply chain, and labor problems. As these issues are worked out, price pressures are likely to ease.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Is the US Economy a Virtual Reality?

– May 2, 2021

“It’s impossible to know precisely what the future portends for all these unprecedented policy shocks over the last year, from money supply and spending bonanzas to lockdowns to sky-high debt accumulation. But because a thing called cause-and-effect still operates in this world – we do not live in virtual reality – it seems wise to look at the seemingly great aggregate data with a gravely skeptical eye. We might be in the midst of the calm before the real storm hits.” ~ Jeffrey Tucker

READ MORE

Energy Price Surge Continues to Drive Everyday Prices Higher

– April 13, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index jumped 1.2 percent in March as energy prices surged for a third consecutive month.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Energy Price Jump Leads Broad-based Increase in Everyday Prices

– March 10, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index jumped 0.8 percent in February, led by increases in the volatile energy category.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Crude Oil Surge Drives Everyday Prices Higher in January

– February 10, 2021

“AIER’s Everyday Price Index jumped 0.8 percent in January, pushed higher primarily by gasoline following the recent surge in crude oil prices.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE

Everyday Prices Rise Just 0.9 Percent in 2020

– January 13, 2021

“Everyday prices increased just 0.9 percent in 2020. The pandemic and government restrictions are likely to distort relative prices, but overall trends are likely to remain moderate.” – Robert Hughes

READ MORE