Defending Freedom, Combating Collectivism

Against collectivist impulses, the defense of freedom, personal responsibility, and the moral, political, legal, and economic foundations of a free society is ever necessary. Protecting the American experiment in ordered liberty is a debt that we owe to the past, and a challenge to pursue in the future. We examine the following issues in this area: the case for free trade vs. protectionism, individualism vs. the new collectivists (DEI/Critical Theory/Marxism/Social Democracy/Economic Nationalism/etc.), shareholder capitalism vs. ESG and stakeholder capitalism, foreign policy for a free society, and the foundations and first principles of freedom and free markets.

Articles

Conserving the Conversation 

“The best defense of economic freedom rests not on statistics calculated yesterday, but rather the enduring knowledge of human nature at the heart of Western civilization.” ~Michael Lucchese

Stiglitz: When Good Minds Seek Fools’ Favor

“Stiglitz believes ‘education’ should be explicitly designed to attack property rights and to weaken the sense of American exceptionalism, the tradition of classical liberalism.” ~Michael Munger

Our Kids Have No Economic Immune Systems

“Kids are told they can do anything, that they are personally mighty and important. But they never have the experience of everyday effort and failure.” ~Michael Munger

The Sixties’ Toxic Legacy 

“Woke-friendly corporations, billionaires, foundations, and individuals with impressive foreign ties are demonstrating the effectiveness of funding campus radicals…echoing similar anti-Western, violent hate-marches throughout Europe and elsewhere.” ~Juliana Geran Pilon

“A Child Is Not the Mere Creature of the State”

“The educational diversity that exists today — district schools, private schools, charter schools, home schools, and microschools among them — are an enduring testimony to the Pierce decision and to that bedrock principle.” ~Jeff Ziegler

Communism’s Routine Evil: East German Edition

“Hoyer attempts to provide a sympathetic reading of an alternative to capitalism – one that engaged in brutality, sure, but made such wonderful strides for inequality, women, and workers, and in which individuals did make their way and find meaning. In doing so, she ignores one big problem: the bodies.” ~Nikolai Wenzel