Economics and Economic Freedom

A free and prosperous society requires a functioning market economy at its foundation. Using a broad array of tools drawn from price theory, public choice analysis, Austrian theory, and classical empiricism, our study of economics and economic freedom explores the underpinnings of the market system, the roots of economic prosperity, and emerging threats to the same in the public policy sphere. Our work includes the measurement of freedom and providing practical economic information for people to make better decisions.

Articles

AIER’s Everyday Price Index Unchanged in May 2024

“The recent data, combined with the deceleration in core CPI in April, suggests the resumption of disinflation. But policymakers have indicated a need for several months of reduced price pressures before considering interest rate cuts.” ~Peter C. Earle

Protectionists Are Wrong: Free Trade is the Path to Prosperity

“Consumers and producers in America are better off with more domestic and international trade. As we don’t want to produce everything we consume daily, trading with others is the most efficient way to meet our needs.” ~Vance Ginn

The Super Market

“Something that you can purchase with income you’ve earned with just a few minutes of your work-time is something that includes the work-effort of thousands or millions of strangers.” ~Donald J. Boudreaux

AI Eases Its Own Labor-Market Transitions

“Not long ago, search engines like Google were not understood by the masses, which forced people through experience to learn how to ‘Google’ webpages in the proper way. Submitting a search query is similarly a new language to learn, just like prompting a language model.” ~Samuel Crombie and Jack Nicastro

Government Failure in One Lesson

“Perhaps the easiest way to explain government failure in one lesson is to remember that there is no such thing as ‘the state.’ Instead, essential decisions about resource use will be made by political actors.” ~Michael Munger

Trade Deficits: Accounting Masquerading as Economics 

“Reducing ‘imports’ would not, in fact, increase GDP at all. At best, doing so would leave GDP unchanged since we would be adding less to consumption, investment, and government spending while subtracting equally less from imports.” ~David Hebert