Fiscal Policy

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011
The election of Spain's new President of Government, Mariano Rajoy, has produced quite a few expectations. His plan seems to go against the tide on some focal points regarding the problems of the European Crisis.
Monday, December 19th, 2011
It’s amazing how so many people don’t get gold. It’s only been 40 years since the dollar was completely severed from it’s once proud golden heritage, yet most finance and econ people are wont to consider gold just another commodity—and a not very “useful” one at that.
Thursday, December 15th, 2011
Strange and amazing things happen when sovereign debt levels get out of hand.
Friday, December 2nd, 2011

“Lord, make me chaste, but not yet.”-St. Augustine

Monday, November 28th, 2011
In recent days, Europe has seen two governments fall: the Prime Ministers from Greece and Italy. New governments where formed. Besides these important changes, the financial markets did not calm down; volatility and uncertainty did not go away as former governments did.
Monday, November 14th, 2011
By all accounts in the news, the FOMC basically threw up its hands at its meeting this week, deciding it can't do anything constructive to improve economic conditions.
Wednesday, August 10th, 2011
The turmoils affecting the economics and financial markets in the United States and Europe do not seem to go away as fast as anyone would want to. Those who warned that this may be a crisis with a "W" shape may well be right.
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011
This week was of high political voltage because of the debt ceiling debate. Could the most important economy in the world default its debt? And in such case, what would happen, not only to the United States, but to the worldwide economy, given that we are in the midst of a financial crisis?
Monday, July 25th, 2011
Article and photo originally published at The Weekly StandardWilliam Kristol July 24, 2011
Thursday, July 14th, 2011
Italy's senate approved today a plan to cut government spending for the period 2011-2014. Italy's public debt is more than 100% of GDP and the fiscal deficit was between 3% to 5.9% of GDP for last year.
Tuesday, May 31st, 2011
"As the House Budget Committee worked on a Republican plan to cut more than $6 trillion of government spending over a decade, the panel’s senior Democrat proposed a symbolic amendment saying national security costs should be included in any responsible deficit-reduction effort.
Monday, May 23rd, 2011
Roberts and Papola have done it again: a rap video that explains the divergent views of two of the most prominent economists of the 20th century. It’s  better than most textbooks, and entertaining to boot.
Tuesday, May 17th, 2011
"Practically speaking,a ceiling that is raised automatically is no ceiling at all. Given that, why not dispense with the pretense? The reason is politics.
Monday, May 16th, 2011
"The US economy is headed for a period of higher inflation and lower growth that makes the nation's debt unappealing when measured against its global competitors, Pimco's Bill Gross told CNBC.
Thursday, May 12th, 2011
"Bernanke continues to dismiss inflation as a big U.S. economic concern, and the Fed decided last week to keep interest rates between 0.00% and 0.25% "for an extended period." But U.S.
Thursday, May 5th, 2011
"F.A. Hayek said that his biggest regret in a lifetime of writing was that he never wrote a book-length refutation of Keynesian economics. He seriously doubted that Keynesian style planning would ever captivate governments, so he focused on different things.
Thursday, May 5th, 2011
"Economists have long disagreed seriously about the costs and benefits of government budget deficits and debt. Following the Second World War, a clash between Keynesian and―orthodox fiscal policy views arose.
Wednesday, May 4th, 2011
"First, the question is not whether the Federal Reserve should raise its target inflation rate above 2% per year. The question is whether the Federal Reserve should raise its target inflation rate to 2% per year.

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